Idaho State Tax Commission

Homeowners and Property Tax

Counties tax land and homes (including manufactured housing) to provide local services and support for independent taxing districts, such as cities and schools.

Read more in our Understanding Property Tax guide, including how your property tax assessment is determined and what to do if you disagree with it.

Tax relief for homeowners

You might be eligible for one or more of the following programs. Read the descriptions below to see if you could qualify.

Homeowner's exemption

If you own and occupy a home (including manufactured homes) as your primary residence, you could qualify for a homeowner's exemption for that home and up to one acre of land.

You only need to apply once. If approved, your exemption is good until any of the following happens:

  • You move and the home is no longer your primary residence
  • You no longer own the home
  • The home's ownership changes (e.g., you put the home in a trust; you start to share ownership with someone else)

The homeowner's exemption will exempt 50% of the value of your home and up to one acre of land (maximum: $100,000) from property tax.

Example:

George's property is a house located in the fictitious city of New Town, Idaho. The total amount of property tax that George owes is calculated like this:

  1. 100% of the market value of his house is $142,900.
  2. 100% of the market value of his half-acre lot on which the house sits is $96,000.
  3. George applied for and is eligible for the homeowner's exemption. This reduces the taxable amount of his property by $100,000.
  4. Line A plus line B minus line C is the taxable value: $138,900

A history of the maximum homeowner's exemption is at the bottom of this page.

Property tax reduction program

This program can reduce the property tax you must pay on your home and up to one acre of land. You must apply every year between January 1 and April 15 with your county assessor's office.

You can find forms and a brochure describing eligibility requirements on the Property Tax Reduction page.

Property Tax Deferral program

The program lets you postpone paying taxes on your home and up to one acre of land. You must apply every year between January 1 and April 15 with your county assessor's office.

Like the Property Tax Reduction program, you must meet specific eligibility requirements. Read more on the Property Tax Deferral page.

Benefit for veterans with a 100% service-connected disability

This program can reduce the property tax you must pay on your home and up to one acre of land. You must apply every year between January 1 and April 15 with your county assessor's office.

You can find forms and a brochure describing eligibility requirements on the 100% Service-Connected Disabled Veterans Benefit page.

Other property tax resources

You can find a list of all our property tax pages on the Property Tax Hub.

The Tax Commission doesn't collect property tax. Counties collect property taxes. The Tax Commission just oversees the property tax system to ensure compliance with state laws. Read more in our Understanding Property Tax guide.

History of maximum homeowner's exemption

YearsMaximum
1980-1982$10,000
1983-2005$50,000
2006$75,000
2007$89,325
2008$100,938
2009$104,471
2010$101,153
2011$92,040
2012$83,974
2013$81,000
2014$83,920
2015$89,580
2016$94,745
2017$100,000
2018$100,000
2019$100,000
2020$100,000

Page last updated October 29, 2019. Last full review of page: October 24, 2019.

This information is for general guidance only. Tax laws are complex and change regularly. We can't cover every circumstance in our guides. This guidance may not apply to your situation. Please contact us with any questions. We work to provide current and accurate information. But some information could have technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. If there's a conflict between current tax law and this information, current tax law will govern.