Idaho State Tax Commission

Tax Commission News Release

Respond to identity verification letters to protect tax refunds

BOISE, Idaho — March 16, 2022 — Last year the Idaho State Tax Commission sent over 22,000 identity verification letters and stopped more than $3.4 million in tax refunds from going to fraudsters.  

This year, the Tax Commission continues its fraud detection reviews that include sending letters asking income tax filers to validate their identity or confirm that they’ve filed their return.

“We take personal information extremely seriously. We won’t issue any refunds until we can verify your identity,” Tax Commission Chairman Jeff McCray said. “Many taxpayers haven’t responded to our letters for several years in a row. They’re missing out on money that belongs to them.” 

All income tax returns go through fraud detection reviews before the state issues refunds. If taxpayers receive a letter, they should take the requested action right away. After validating their identity or confirming that they filed a return, processing of the refund will continue. 

As part of its fraud detection, the Tax Commission partners with the IRS, other state tax agencies, tax professionals, software developers, and financial institutions to identify and share information about fraud and identity theft. 

If a taxpayer receives a verification letter but hasn’t filed a return, they could be a victim of identity theft. They can contact the Tax Commission for help taking the next steps.

For more information, visit tax.idaho.gov/idverify. Or call (208) 334-7660 in the Boise area or toll free at (800) 972-7660. 

The deadline to file 2021 income taxes is Monday, April 18. 

Posted 03-16-2022
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